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I'm an omnivore?

From a link pasted on law.librarians, I did this survey, to find out where I fit in the technology world. It's aimed at the American public, but here's my results anyway:



Where do you fit?

Your Results

Based on your answers to the questionnaire, you most closely resemble survey respondents within the Omnivores typology group. This does not mean that you necessarily fit every group characteristic.

Omnivores make up 8% of the American public.

Basic Description
Members of this group use their extensive suite of technology tools to do an enormous range of things online, on the go, and with their cell phones. Omnivores are highly engaged with video online and digital content. Between blogging, maintaining their Web pages, remixing digital content, or posting their creations to their websites, they are creative participants in cyberspace.

Defining Characteristics
You might see them watching video on an iPod. They might talk about their video games or their participation in virtual worlds the way their parents talked about their favorite TV episode a generation ago. Much of this chatter will take place via instant messages, texting on a cell phone, or on personal blogs. Omnivores are particularly active in dealing with video content. Most have video or digital cameras, and most have tried watching TV on a non-television device, such as a laptop or a cell phone.

Omnivores embrace all this connectivity, feeling confident in how they manage information and their many devices. This puts information technology at the center of how they express themselves, do their jobs, and connect to their friends.

Who They Are
They are young, ethnically diverse, and mostly male (70%). The median age is 28; just more than half of them are under age 30, versus one in five in the general population. Over half are white (64%) and 11% are black (compared to 12% in the general population). English-speaking Hispanics make up 18% of this group. Perhaps unsurprisingly, many (42% versus the 13% average) of Omnivores are students.

I have to protest - not only am I not a white male American, I'm also really not very technical at all. My phone is 2 years old (and I tried very hard to get one without a radio, MPs player, camera etc as I don't need them, but it was impossible), as is my MP3 player (Zen, not Apple), I only got a laptop to save space on my desk (and HATE the touchpad, so have a USB mouse plugged in), I don't make mashups, create video...I only recently replaced my 3 year old digital camera, and that was because the 4MP one I had died a grinding, jamming death...I frequently leave my phone on silent and ignore it, as I don't feel that I have to be available to everyone while trying to sit quietly on a bus - I don't feel a need to share all my conversations with the general public!

In short, I'm the least technical I can be while still keeping up with life. Apparently, blogging, using forums / message boards, being able to edit photos a little bit, and owning what are now pretty standard devices such as a mobile and anMP3 player make me a techno geek!

Comments

Karen said…
"the least technical I can be while still keeping up with life" pretty much sums me up too.

So I tried the survey and came out as a 'connector'. Apparently we connectors are "participants in cyberspace...but not at the rate of Omnivores. They are not as sure-footed in their dealings with ICTs as Omnivores."

They seem to be conflating technical ability with enthusiasm for technology.

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