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Don't go on holiday!

I tell ya, it takes at least a week to catch up on the week you were away...and now I'm off to Dublin this afternoon until Sunday, so I can only imagine how long it'll take me to catch up again when I get back!

One useful thing I have done while on holibobs though is play with Yahoo Pipes, to create a feed of feeds. After being a total doofus and needing the help of the lovely law.librarians group to fix things (how come they could easily explain what a video didn't?) I've had a stab at making some usefulness from the UK Librarian Bloggers wiki, starting with (hopefully) a feed of all the academic library blog feeds on there.

If I'm lucky, you should be able to do something with it, like subscribe to it. Although I haven't got as far as actually testing that theory myself.
Hopefully, you'll find it here :
And even more hopefully, it'll be useful to someone! Let me know if it works, and if it's useful. If it is, I'll start creating more...public libraries, special libraries, Scottish, English, Welsh etc...

Comments

Jo Alcock said…
I was thinking of doing something like this with the wiki feeds too Jennie and had been playing with Yahoo Pipes. Your feed works great (or seems to anyway - I've added it to my Bloglines and it seems to have worked fine).
James Mullan said…
I love Yahoo Pipes, at least what I can see of it, unfortunately it requires IE7 and we are currently only on IE6 which YP doesn't support. I have created a pipe though and it was soo easy it was just wrong and I saw results straight away!

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