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Selected Session Cases available online

The Scottish Council of Law Reporting, publishers of the Session Cases, have made selected cases available for free from their website.

In their own words:

For some years the Scottish Council of Law Reporting has provided the law-teaching universities in Scotland with a CD-ROM containing cases selected from the Session Cases® archive to distribute as a learning aid to their students. Technologies change, and the Council is pleased to provide a database of Scottish cases selected from their archive as an open access resource.

The only problem I'm having is finding out a listing or index of what these selected cases are, but hey, for allowing even some access to an otherwise subscriber access only database, I'm not complaining!

Comments

James Mullan said…
Jennie, the contents of this source are listed here http://www.justis.com/search.aspx?search=contents the cases are listed chronologically and display how many cases are available from each year.
Jennie said…
I hate the Justis SC navigation almost as much as I hate LexisNexis's!

We have a sub to the Session Cases online at the moment anyway, but the navigation for them isn't so hot, and just listing that there's a case in a year doesn't really help.

If there was a master list of the case names, it would mean glancing at that to see if it was on there, instead of having to burrow into half a dozen click boxes (Justis > Cases > Scottish Cases > Session Cases > Select year > Show results) to confirm if the case you want is one of the "selected" ones or not.

Again, it *is* free, but it would be better if was also simpler to use! ;)

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