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Dear Bloglines...

....I love you, really, I do.

I know, I know: I may have become slightly disillusioned late last year, and threatened to leave you for Greader, or Netvibes, or NewsGator, or any of the other feed readers I tried out when you were having "personal issues" and trying to "find yourself".

But I stayed with your original version, I didn't desert you for that fickle Beta, I liked you just the way you were. And I didn't get on with those others like I do with you.

And I thought you appreciated that. You bucked up your ideas, sorted yourself out, and I thought we were happy together.
Until this week.

My dear, why do you now think I want you to import every post, from every feed I take, dating back to 2007, all marked as new and unread?

I mean, it's nice that you want me to have comprehensive information, but really, it would have been better just to stick with what I asked you to do, which was supply me with the feeds, and make them go away once I'd read them. It's nice that you think I might want to keep them around, but really...no.

And that new thing you're doing of making feeds appear unread, even though I'd read them a few seconds before? And regardless of how many times I "mark as read"? Stop it. It's not as endearing as you may think it is. And it wasn't even funny the first time.

Now, I think we're strong enough to be able to work through these issues together, but it's got to be a team effort. So, if I promise to not shriek in a high pitched manner, and mash the keys, will you promise to stop doing these really, really annoying things to me?

Mmkay?

Comments

Matt said…
You're not alone. Bloglines is really having problems this week.
Meg Kribble said…
I could have written that. It makes me so sad when Bloglines leaves me tempted to dally with other readers.
rasputnik said…
NetNewsWire is very happy to slurp your OPML from Bloglines (I left it during the last round of plumber appearances and haven't missed it).
Jennie said…
Rasputnik, it looks like NetNewsWire is for Macs (which I don't have), but NewsGator bought the parent company, and NewsGator's actually so far my favourite of the others I'm trying - it looks and acts very similarly to BlogLines. After another few days of 'blips', I think me and Bloglines are maybe going to have to take a 'time out'...

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