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Happy birthday, UK Library Bloggers wiki! Be free!

Yeeesh, it's been 2 whole years since I started building you out of the results of Google, Yahoo,Technorati and other random searches. Very quickly I realised that I couldn't bring you up properly on my own, so Auntie Jo, Auntie Christine, and Uncle Phil stepped in to help. Without them, you might have gotten a bit unruly, and grown up all scraggly and without any discipline. I think that together, we've done quite well, keeping you nicely in shape and making sure you're as well informed and as up to date as possible.

And now that you're all grown up, we've realised that the time has come to set you free in the world, to let you make your own way, meet new people, make your own changes, grow and develop in ways we might not be able to help you with ourselves. So....we've unlocked you, and now anybody (who registers with PBWorks) can edit, update and add to you. We know it's a risk, but we think you're old enough now to be able to look after yourself. Just avoid the bad people who might want to corrupt you, and be nice to the people who want to add useful things to you.

And remember, you can always come home if you need to, mmkay?

Comments

Jo Alcock said…
*wipes tear* They grow up so quickly these days...

Thanks again for your hard work on this Jennie, is a really useful resource and I hope it continues to grow. :)
shinyforager said…
I think this is such a great resource and I was wondering about setting up a library-related wiki myself - for Irish library-related stuff. Can I ask why you chose PBworks as opposed to another wiki platform? I was considering using WIkipedia but I realise that means anyone at all can edit it...
Jennie said…
@shinyforager To be honest, I can't really remember! I think it may well be to do with the fact that I had already used one to make a staff handbook for me and my boss (who works in a diferent office) to share, so I'd had a fairly good play about with it, and knew now to use it.
I think I originally read an article referring to it, and I just liked the fun of the "peanut butter" name! :)
shinyforager said…
Thanks Jennie, this is useful to know. There are so many wikis to choose from that I was starting to get bewildered but it doesn't seem that the choice of wiki makes a huge difference. Thanks again!

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