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Happy workday to meeeeeeeeee!

Oh yes, today I'll have been with my current employer for 5 whole, entire years (of course, I started work on a weekday, not a weekend, but lets not be picky here). And long may my present employment continue: I do enjoy my work, there's always something interesting to learn each day, and I have a fabulous and fun boss who supports me and encourages me to explore any techie interests I have. These are rare and wonderous things to be able to say, and I know it. *I am now touching wood and doing any other superstitious manoeuvres to avoid bringing disaster upon me for these outrageous statements of happiness and contentment*

For someone in their early thirties (ok, thirty one, but early thirties sounds much more grown up), to have been in the same position for anything over a few years is slightly uncommon, and it seems this sort of "settled" employment is something that the newer generation of professionals are unlikely to have. There ain't no such thing as a "job for life" any more, but is that a good or a bad thing? I suppose it depends on whether you're moving on from a position because you want to, or because you have to. A voluntary move must be an exciting thing, and I can sometimes find it difficult to keep track of professional friends, as they suddenly announce they're off to pastures new!

So, what are your expectations in a job now? A few years, then moving on? Or staying for as long as they'll have you?

Comments

CraigW said…
Depends on the job. If try can keep me stimulated and challenged then I'll stay, but I tend to find a move every 18 months to two years brings me new exciting challenges that I couldn't get if I stayed in the same place.
Simon XIX said…
Congrats. Sounds like you've really found your place.
My plan is to skip around the profession for a bit until I find the position where I'm supposed to be (I have an idea of what that is but that's subject to change as I develop).
James Mullan said…
Like the other comments have said it does depends a lot on the role. If you're happy and stimulated great, if not maybe you should move on. But there's no pointing in moving on just because you think the grass might be greener it actually has to be! I was in my last job for almost 9 years, which I think was a huge amount of time but wasn't compared to some of my colleagues!
Joanne Amos said…
I like to believe I am a Human On Assignment From God....at least it has been that way now for six years. God Bless you with your new job!!!

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