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When silliness becomes real goodness

Well, back in December I thought it's be fun to put together a gift list for the stereotypical librarian, and this included, of course, library-based options, mainly from GoodGifts.org. I've used Goodgifts before (it's actually now a running joke in my family: if I hand over an envelope for an event, they tend to wail "Oh don't tell us you've bought me another orphan!"), so I though it'd be nice to feature their library idea.

And there I left it - as a nice idea, but one for other people. And of course, the awesome option of buying a full library was just mad - nobody I knew could afford that!

But I reckoned without theREALwikiman, and other fab librarians around the world. Ned saw my blog post, and retweeted the link...and him and others have got together to do something fabulous: they ARE going to buy that library! And if there's not enough money for that permanent library, then maybe they can fund some mobile ones, or the stock for them...anything will help. They're working together, needing only a small amount from lots of people, to make a good thing happen.

Now, I've done my bit and donated...what good thing have you done today? If your answer is "nothing yet", then now's your chance to stockpile some of those Good Karma points, for just a few pennies...

Donate here, do it, do it, do it!


Comments

HL said…
Look at you! Prompting charitable actions :) YAY!
Andromeda said…
Thanks for spreading the word! I'm so happy you found this charity in the first place.

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