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Tolley's Tax Deformity - a new disease?


I am slightly concerned about these...growths that I've found on my Tolley's Tax Handbooks...what could be in there?
Are they buboes? Should I be using the Medieval approach of protecting myself with sweet smelling nosegays?
Is it the sign of an infestation of book-flesh eating bugs? Will they eventually burst out from the spines in a spray of paper shreds? Like the chestburster from Alien, but with more glue, and less blood?

I am afraid.

If you don't hear from me by the end of January, send in the search parties. Although I'd recommend they be wearing with HazMat suits, probably Type 1.

And bring tongs.

Comments

Michael said…
Wouldn't Gordon Freeman's hazard suit from Half Life be a better bet? :p

In any case - good luck.
Juno said…
OMG! Mine have them too!! We're doomed...can I borrow your HazMAt suit?
Mark Wadsworth said…
Splendid photo, thanks, I've borrowed it for my blog.

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