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Deck the halls with...erm...pictures of books?


Yes, it's (almost*) the last of my library-gift themed blog posts, and it's time to look at the walls. Those bare, booooooring library walls. Surely the librarian in your life would like a bit of art on them to perk them up a bit?

How about the traditional approach, of some books? Painted, drawn, cut out, coloured in: there's books aplenty for those walls:

Shop (I'm a bit scared by the fact the desk and chairs seem to be levitating....)
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Shop (this one features a traditional library favourite - the cat. It's also available with a dog)
Shop (I'm not sure if they're burning, or melting)
Shop (not the most restful of library images, that's for sure)
Shop

Shop

Hell, maybe you just want a photo of books, never mind all this arty-farty stuff:
Shop

Perhaps an image of an unusual mode of transport for bringing library books back would fit in with the decor nicely?
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Or another library inhabitant?
Shop (this is the only type of bookworm I want to see in my library!)

Or how about an even more librarish image: the image of a library itself?
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Although perhaps you prefer your libraries to look....spooky?
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Quotes about books and reading often go down well too:

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Shop (hey, what about the other librarians?)
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Shop

Or maybe you'd like images where the librarian themselves feature?
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Even if they're not in human form:
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Shop (All librarians are angels. Fact.)

Perhaps a bit of humour would be appreciated?
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Or, a linocut of a cosy, comfy looking sort of library to settle down in for a good read:
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But, my vote for "the best thing to put on a library wall" is...an entire, miniature library. This one is on the theme of that traditional librarian favourite: cats.

Shop (subliminal message - BUY ME IT!)
* Still to come - a hodgepodge of random library-related stuff that I've found since the previous posts.

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