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Steampunking Austen

So, I finished Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters a few days ago. I have to say, I enjoyed this even more than Pride and Prejudice and Zombies. Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters has a society that was much more altered from the original (I imagine, not having read it), and which was much more steampunk, and humorous, than I expected. Lots of boats, pirates, monsters, strange chants, various animal attacks, experiments, underground cities, and trained mutant lobsters. With some old-fashioned morality and "proper" behaviour thrown in.
And of course, there's various mysterious sub-plots, the solution only revealed at the end, which hints about pop up throughout the book.
I don't want to say much more, so I don't ruin the fun of discovering the contents. I'd definitely recommend giving this one a go!

Comments

Alan Plawtridge said…
I think I'll definitely have to look into getting this and Zombies. However, I've never read the originals. Will the point of the book be lost on me if that's the case, or will it still be enjoyable?
Jennie said…
I haven't read the originals either (And have no intention of doing so), but both books stand well on their own.
I have to say though, that SSSM is a better read, I think it benefits from having the background / setting so much changed, whereas PPZ sticks much more to the original setting.
jazzbaby3 said…
I'm off to my local lib forthwith. I love steampunk and have been searching for decent novels. Thanks for the recommendation young Missy.
Jennie said…
Madame Jazzbaby, my copy's currently on loan to Glorious Leader, but if you can't get a copy at your library, let me know, and I'll pass it on to you when she's done :)

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