Skip to main content

The trauma of training

*Warning - extreme and pointed sarcasm may be used in this post. Those with weak hearts and constitutions may want to stop reading now*

Dear people-who-have-agreed-to-attend-the-training-with-a-supplier-that-we've-set-up-for-your-benefit, I am very, very sorry.
I obviously forgot a few things.

I forgot:

  • That I am your personal diary secretary, and I myself should have reminded you that you had agreed to attend this training.
  • That you are incapable of leaving your seat without my specific instruction to point you towards a training room, and therefore cannot make your own way to your training.
  • That the frequent pop up reminders on your computer of your imminent training session are only for you to ignore. Every time they pop up. For an hour beforehand. Every 10 minutes.
  • That you can only tell me that you're not attending the session once I have had to come looking for you and ask you personally.
  • That you cannot write an email or pick up the phone to spend 20 seconds telling me you will no longer be attending, and thereby stop me wasting my time chasing around the building for you.

Foolishly, I assumed you were adults, and therefore able to deal with grown-up stuff like this.

Of course, when you have any issues with the product you didn't attend training on, you'll be able to solve them yourselves, won't you? Excellent.

Comments

thewikiman said…
Haha, I feel your pain Jennie! We can only shake our heads in awe at how frightfully important all these terribly busy people are...
Jennifer Vass said…
Oh I so feel your pain - so many sessions where they don't bother turning up, or calling, or cancelling... I can't help but wonder if they treat their other appointments this way?
I do rather enjoy being very short with people who don't bother to turn up to training and then shockingly can't actually do the things the training would have helped them with.
So very frustrating...

Popular posts from this blog

A ladyfellowing

Well, in January this year, I submitted my Fellowship portfolio, and heard in April that it had been successful, making me now officially a Ladyfellow and able to add FCLIP after my name, yay!

Me registration fees were paid in September 2015, so technically it took less than 18 months from registration to submission. However, that doesn’t include the good few months before that, preparing my thoughts, talking to my mentor, and plotting out just how I would Get This Damn Thing Done, so realistically, it was more like a 2 year process.

So, how big a task was it? In a “dear god, what have I done” moment, I totalled up the word count of all items in the portfolio, and it came to approximately 30,000 words. That’s easily the largest piece of work I’ve ever produced (I’m a rubbish student, so I’ve never had to produce an academic dissertation). So yes, it turns out that reviewing your career and achievements to date, and reflecting on what you’ve learned from all of your experiences is quite …

Relaunching a library service

What do you do when you decide to do what is verging on library-based insanity, and basically scrap your current library service, and relaunch everything - physical layout, LMS, and classification system? In my case, spend a year, planning, developing, preparing….and then a frantic few weeks hauling stock!
The background to this apparent madness is this: when I took on this role I inherited a library using a layout that didn’t seem to make sense, a classification system I wasn’t familiar with, and an LMS that had been in place for 20 years but didn’t seem suited to our needs. As I was new to the library, a major part of the time I had available while settling in during my initial few months was dedicated to exploring how well these things were working, both for users, and library staff. I had the benefit of my colleague also being new to the library, only a few months after me, so together we looked at these issues with fresh eyes.We came to the following conclusions: The physical layou…