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There's a lack of UK blawgers?

Well, apparently, according to the recent Times article.

The only problem is, Alex Wade doesn't seem to have bothered actually doing any proper research. They've decided that only staff at law firms are likely to blog, or have any knowledge of the law, thereby ruling out advocates / barristers, academic law professionals, support staff / librarians, students.... There are lots of law blogs out there, by all sorts of people working in the law, all it takes to find them is a few minutes!

I randomly selected one of the blawgs listed in the article, and a quick look at some of Geeklawyers blawgroll lists the following:
And link-hopping from these can find you even more UK blawgs, and the blawgs of anonymous law students and those in pupillage...so why didn't the Times journalist actually spend the time to do that? Also, as discussed here, some of the blogs linked to aren't even current. And the final, splendid point  -  the fact that almost none of the links work, as there have been spaces inserted into them...go proof readers! Or, should that be 'link-checkers'?

Comments

geeklawyer said…
Furthermore my blawgroll is rarely attended to; there are loads more that I could add if I wanted. Binary law was/is best directory
Anonymous said…
Jennie Law.... I suspect (a) That Wade could not be arsed to Wade through any blogrolls - shoddy journalis ... and (B) I suspect the dark hand of Messieurs Newsom and Geeklawyer - in their drive to appear on TV, radio, the press and net media... were fivers involved... only time will tell.

Being serious - we shall just have to attend to our promotion of blogs...

I am cancelling my subscription to the Times of course and shall be referring to this preposterous report by Wade in my Postcard from The Bounty this weekend

Charon QC
from The Boat, Chelsea
Law Minx said…
No-one gives a toss about us Putative Barristers(Pupils and otherwise)/Bar and Law Students of course, even though we make up quite a bit of the blogging community. Then again, I we should be used to invisibility, given the account the profession takes of us, and esteem in which we are held (i.e. lower than WhalePooh)
Though I am very Glad to see Mr GeekLawyer mentioned the whole Times piece is poorly thought through and extremely shody.

I am a bit cross.

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